The post How to Take a Dog’s Temperature by Martha M. Everett emerged first on Dogster. Copying over part articles conflicts on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid off, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we have known that you like the essay and would desire it if you continued sharing simply the first clause of an section, then relating out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

The favourite pattern of feeling a dog’s nose and ears to see if he has a fever doesn’t work. The only direction to know your dog’s temperature with any degree of certainty is to use a thermometer.

What to use to take your dog’s temperature: Thermometers met precisely for babies are available for about $12. Veterinarian Kelly Tart recommends using a rapid-reading digital thermometer, which can record a temperature in about 10 seconds and has an easy-to-read lighted spectacle screen. Do not use a glass thermometer; they can break, and some contain mercury.

Where to take your dog’s temperature: The most accurate place to take a dog’s temperature is the rectum. Ear thermometers can be inaccurate because they do not reach far enough into the ear canal, Dr. Tart says.

How to take your dog’s temperature

1. Have someone help you by containing the dog’s head and body. Lay your bird-dog on his line-up to keep him from sitting on the thermometer.

2. For easier insertion, coat the thermometer’s end with a lubricant, such as Vaseline or K-Y Jelly.

3. Insert the thermometer about 1 inch for small dogs and 2 to 3 inches for medium and massive hounds. Go gradually, and never action the thermometer.

4. Gently withdraw existing thermometer when it beeps.

If your pup declarations too much or you are uncertain or embarrassing about taking your dog’s temperature, it’s best to have your veterinarian do it.

Top photograph: Ocskaymark | Getty Images

Read Next: Why Do Dogs Have a Higher Body Temperature ?

The post How to Take a Dog’s Temperature by Martha M. Everett materialized first on Dogster. Copying over part articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we have known that you like the essay and would enjoy it if you continued sharing really the first clause of an article, then linking out to the rest of the patch on Dogster.com.

Read more: dogster.com